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Jovel Broqueza, MSN, APN

Ms. Jovel Broqueza is a Board-Certified Family Nurse Practitioner through the American Nurses Credentialing Center (AMCC) and a member of the Sigma Theta Tau National Honor Society.  She earned her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from St. Paul University, Philippines, and her Master of Science Degree in Nursing at North Park University in Chicago.

While working as a Registered Nurse, Jovel became extremely passionate about health promotion and prevention.  She decided to focus her energy on becoming a family nurse practitioner with the goal of helping to empower patients in managing their chronic diseases using a holistic approach that will, in turn, decrease hospital admissions.  Jovel’s extensive healthcare career has resulted in her exposure to many areas of nursing including weight loss management, chronic disease management, mental health assessment, psychotropic medication management, and nursing education.

Jovel joining Dr. Parisi & Associates, P.C. in 2016.  She is also a visiting professor at Chamberlain College of Nursing and an adjunct faculty member at the College of DuPage.

Sandi Jiongco, MSN, APN

sandi_jiongcoMs. Sandi Jiongco, MSN, APN is an American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) board-certified Family Nurse Practitioner.  Sandi completed her Bachelors of Nursing Degree (BSN) with a minor in Family Studies from Marquette University and went on to complete her Masters of Nursing Degree (MSN) from Olivet Nazarene University in 2013.  She also has a Masters Degree in Health Law and Policy with distinction from DePaul University in Chicago.  Her thesis examined the socioeconomic factors affecting obstetrical length of stay.  Sandi has a wide array of skills and experience, ranging from working in provider relations, contracting, and utilization management with a large insurance company to working with the entire lifespan of age groups in clinics, hospitals and school settings.

Since becoming a Board-Certified Nurse Practitioner, Sandi has been employed at an outpatient wound care and hyperbaric oxygen clinic.  As part of her wound care practice, Sandi has earned several wound care specialty certifications.  Sandi has always had a keen interest in working in behavioral healthcare.  As a primary care provider, she frequently found herself managing psychotropic medications.  In this sense, Sandi views her work with Dr. Parisi & Associates, P.C. as a natural extension of her work as a primary care provider.

Sandi grew up on a farm in a small town in Southern Wisconsin.  She is married and enjoys spending time with her husband and special needs teenage son.  Her hobbies include horseback riding and catching up on sitcoms.  Sandi is a strong advocate for those with autism and other developmental delays.  Sandi takes pride in thinking outside of the box to assist her clients in achieving their healthcare goals.

How to Recognize the Signs of Schizophrenia

treat schizophreniaAbout one in 100 Americans are diagnosed with schizophrenia, a treatable serious mental illness that affects a person’s thoughts, feelings, mood, and overall functioning according to the American Psychological Association (APA). (1) With statistics like that, it’s a wonder why the mass public isn’t more educated about schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia is often diagnosed through early adulthood in teens and early 20s and is rarely identified later in life. At first many of the symptoms of schizophrenia may go unnoticed but by knowing what to look for and recognizing signs you can receive early treatment. To help you learn more about this mental illness and how to detect it, here’s how to recognize the signs of schizophrenia.

  • Trouble thinking logically. People with the onset of schizophrenia sometimes have trouble thinking logically. This may include making informed decisions, as well.
  • Difficulty paying attention. A short attention span, or the struggle to stay focused on one event can be a potential sign of schizophrenia. Because difficulty paying attention is a symptom for a variety of illnesses and disorders it’s important that it is paired with other symptoms as well before concluding schizophrenia.
  • Working memory problems. Because schizophrenia is a mental illness it has the ability to impair ones’ working memory, or more commonly known as short term memory. Forgetting recent events like where you set your keys or what you ate for lunch earlier that day are both examples of short term memory.
  • Hallucinations. A more serious sign of schizophrenia is experiencing hallucinations. These hallucinations often include hearing voices or seeing things that others do not see.
  • Speaking little. If you are typically a chatter box but recently don’t have the desire to speak much, there may be an underlying problem. Speaking little is another sign of schizophrenia.
  • Repetitive body movements. Agitated or repetitive body movements are common in those who suffer with schizophrenia. These movements can be seen as repetitive movements being performed over and over again.
  • False beliefs. As part of the thought disorder, false beliefs that may seem odd or wrong are believable to you even after loved ones try to redirect your thinking. These thoughts often do not line up with the person’s typical thinking and may make little to no sense.
  • Difficult to understand. As a person with schizophrenia struggles to organize their thoughts their speech can become jumbled and difficult to understand. They may even make up meaningless words or stop talking midsentence.

Coping with any mental illness is a struggle, including schizophrenia. But with 1 in every 100 Americans diagnosed with schizophrenia it’s time to better educate the public about what to look for. It’s important to note that treatment helps relieve many symptoms of schizophrenia and many people with the illness continue to lead rewarding and meaningful lives in their communities, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. (2) Learning how to recognize signs of schizophrenia is the first step toward treatment and the start to living that rewarding and meaningful life.

Mark D. Parisi, Psy.D. & Associates, P.C. provides counseling, psychological testing, and psychotropic medication management in Mount Prospect and Chicago – serving surrounding Cook, Lake, DuPage, and Will Counties. They accept most insurance and offer extremely affordable sliding scale rates. Call (847) 909-9858 for a free, no-obligation telephone consultation

 

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Sources:

  1. Recognizing the Signs of Schizophrenia, Schizophrenia statistics and definition, 2015, http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/recognizing-schizophrenia.aspx
  2. What is Schizophrenia?, Schizophrenia treatment, 2015, http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/schizophrenia/index.shtml

 

Can You Fake Mental Illness?

While you may be thinking, “Why would anyone want to fake a mental illness,” you may be surprised to learn that while mental illnesses have their obvious negatives, they also offer a handful of positives. Some of which are even believed to be worth faking it for.

mental illnessWe see hideous crimes committed regularly in society. There is almost always something horrific in the news that you would think, “Clearly that person must be insane to commit such a horrible crime against humanity.” And so, we watch as they choose to plea insanity. Now, the significance of proving insanity in the court room is that if you are deemed insane you are no longer eligible for the death penalty and cannot be held responsible for your actions in the same way a sane person would be, according to the U.S. Criminal Resource Manual. (1) An obvious draw for completely sane people to want to fake a mental illness, right?

You certainly don’t have to commit a horrible crime against humanity to consider the idea of faking a mental illness. Average people, leading average lives attempt to fake mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety often. Again, you may be asking yourself, “Why?” People with mental illnesses, similar to physical illnesses, receive attention. People want to hear about your struggle and help you cope or even help you overcome your mental illness. People who strongly desire attention may seek it through faking sick, mentally. But is it possible?

According to the Queensland government, “It is extremely difficult to ‘fake’ mental illness, particularly for an extended period of time.” (2) While someone may be able to imitate depression-like or insanity-like symptoms for a short period of time, eventually ones’ true colors will begin to show. In addition, a series of tests have been specifically put in place to weed out any potential fakers when it comes to pleading insanity within the court room.

It is important to note that while people who attempt to fake a mental illness for whatever benefit entices them often has an underlying root cause. They may have a great need for attention from others or enjoy lying and fooling people. Or they simply want an escape from the responsibility of the crimes they commit. Whatever the case may be, it’s important for us to look beyond the failed attempt to deceive.

From the court room to the dinner table and everywhere in-between, you may witness someone who attempts to fake a mental illness. Whether it be insanity, depression, anxiety, or another form of mental illness, there are a variety of benefits that comes with faking it. But don’t be alarmed. Faking a mental illness is extremely difficult, especially for an extended period of time. It turns out, you can’t fake it!

Mark D. Parisi, Psy.D. & Associates, P.C. provides counseling, psychological testing, and psychotropic medication management in Mount Prospect and Chicago – serving surrounding Cook, Lake, DuPage, and Will Counties. They accept most insurance and offer extremely affordable sliding scale rates. Call (847) 909-9858 for a free, no-obligation telephone consultation

 

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Sources:

  1. Criminal Resource Manual, Perks of pleading insanity, 2015, http://www.justice.gov/usam/criminal-resource-manual-634-insanity-defense-reform-act-1984
  2. Frequently Asked Questions about Mental Illness, Difficult to fake mental illness quote, 2006, https://www.health.qld.gov.au/forensicmentalhealth/indigenous/docs/ind_fs1.pdf

Will Consistency Help Treat Bipolar Disorder?

consistencyIt is common for people to have emotional highs and lows caused by everyday stress.  However, there are some people who suffer from a severe mental illness known as bipolar disorder in which sudden shifts in mood and energy may be seen on a regular basis (1).  These mood swings can negatively affect a person’s home life as well as his career if they are not controlled as well as possible.  However, as with most mental illnesses, having a consistent routine can ease the symptoms and make the disorder easier to handle.  There are 3 areas of consistency that should be met.

1. Be consistent in your treatment. There are many treatments that can be used for bipolar disorder.  Some people are capable of coping with it on their own while others may need the help of a therapist or need to take medication to provide a balance (1).  No matter which one you choose, however, it is important to be consistent in your treatment.

For example, once you find a good therapist, stick with him so that you become comfortable talking to him.  Once you find a medicinal regimen that is providing relief, continue taking the same type and amount; switching medicines can also mean suffering from different side effects.  Constantly looking for new doctors or trying new medicines is going to cause even more stress for a person with bipolar disorder.

2. Be consistent in your daily routine. A person who knows what to expect on a daily basis will be able to cope better with bipolar disorder, according to the American Psychological Association. (2).  A daily and weekly routine should consist of schedules for many things, such as work, school, errands, exercise, sleep, relaxation, etc.

For example, try to eat each meal and snack around the same time each day, and choose your foods wisely to keep your body and mind regulated.  Even if that means taking a break at work to replenish your body, it is important to stay consistent.  As part of your routine, you can even do your best to control how much time is spent with certain people.  Having a routine of daily activities will prevent unexpected circumstances, which can easily trigger a reaction in someone with bipolar disorder.

3. Be consistent in your sleep. Getting enough sleep has been shown to provide relief from many physical and mental ailments, and the same is true with bipolar disorder.  Sleep deprivation can increase the effects of bipolar disease in many ways.

First, the overall quality of life is lessened, which can cause more depression and stress.  Second, sleep deprivation can increase the chances of a relapse in a person who has the disorder under control.  Third, cognitive functions are greatly affected by a person’s sleep habits, and this is especially true in those that suffer from a mental illness.  If you are having trouble getting enough sleep, you can make adjustments to your diet and physical activity and see if that helps (3).

Routines and consistency are beneficial to everyone, but this is particularly true for those with bipolar disorder.  If you are struggling to control your symptoms, sticking to a routine may be just what you need.

Mark D. Parisi, Psy.D. & Associates, P.C. provides counseling, psychological testing, and psychotropic medication management in Mount Prospect and Chicago – serving surrounding Cook, Lake, DuPage, and Will Counties. They accept most insurance and offer extremely affordable sliding scale rates. Call (847) 909-9858 for a free, no-obligation telephone consultation.

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Sources:
1. What is Bipolar Disorder? Definition and treatments, 2015, http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/bipolar-disorder/index.shtml
2. Consistent Routines May Ease Bipolar Disorder, Importance of daily routines, 2008, http://www.apa.org/monitor/feb08/consistent.aspx
3. Sleep Disturbance in Bipolar Disorder, Importance of sleep, 2009, http://www.apa.org/monitor/feb08/consistent.aspx

Marineta Saunderson, MSN, APN

marineta_saundersonMs. Marineta Saunderson, MSN, APN is Board-Certified in the State of Ilinois as a Family Nurse Practitioner.  She completed her Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) from Northern Illinois University in 2010.  Marineta earned two undergraduate degrees – her Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Psychology / General Science from the University of Dubuque in Iowa in 1995 and her Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) from Rockford College in 1999.

Marineta presently works at Advanced Primary Health Care in Aurora, Illinois, where she provides primary care medicine to all age groups served by the clinic.  She also continues to work at Rush Copley Medical Center in Aurora, Illinois, as a Neonatal Intensive Care Nurse.  Marineta’s work experiences as a nurse are varied and include work as a pediatric nurse specialist at Central DuPage Hospital and a Psychiatric Nurse at Linden Oaks Mental Health Center in Naperville, Illinois.

Marienta is excited to get back into the field of psychiatry as an Advanced Practice Nurse.  She holds Certification through the ANCC as a Family Nurse Practitioner.

Paula Karnick, Ph.D., APN, Nurse Practitioner

Paula Karnick, Ph.D., APN

Paula Karnick, Ph.D., APN, Nurse PractitionerDr. Paula Karnick completed her Master of Science Degree in Nursing (MSN) at North Park University in 1998. She went on earn her Adult Nurse Practitioner Certificate from North Park University and Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Certificate from Marquette University in 1999. Dr. Karnick finished her Doctor of Philosphy Degree (Ph.D.) in Nursing in 2003.

Dr. Karnick is certified as both an Adult and Pediatric Nurse Practitioner in the State of Illinois and has worked in a variety of capacities as both as nurse educator and clinician. Her recent experiences include serving as Clinic Coordinator of Take Care Health as well as numerous scholarly and teaching placements including serving as Director of Education for the Emergency Nurses Association, Peer Reviewer for the Journal of Emergency Nursing, and as Adjunct Faculty at Resurrection University.

Dr. Karnick joined the psychiatric staff at Mark D. Parisi, Psy.D. & Associates, P.C. in 2013. Dr. Karnick is a member of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, the Emergency Nurses Association, the Illinois Society of Nurse Practitioners, the National Assocation of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and the International Society of Parse Scholars.

Irma E. Funes

Irma Funes, MSN, APN

Ms. Irma E. Funes chicago illinoisMs. Irma E. Funes, MSN, APN, CNN is an ANCC Board-Certified Nurse Practitioner.

She earned her Master of Science Degree in Nursing (MSN) from North Park University in Chicago. Irma has a vast array of experience in primary care, wellness / hypertension management, and renal medicine.

She is able to provide the full spectrum of psychotropic medication management to adults eighteen (18) years of age and older. Irma has experience diagnosing and treating a variety of mental health issues ranging from depression, anxiety, psychotic disorders, and substance abuse / dependency.

Irma values working in collaboration with her clients and their families to establish individualized treatment plans to achieve wellness through psychoeducation, psychotherapy, and focused, evidence-based psychotropic medication management.