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Michael Juhasz, LCPC, CADC

mike_juhasz picMichael (Mike) Juhasz, LCPC, CADC is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) in Illinois and received his Masters of Arts Degree in Psychology from the University of Illinois, Springfield in 1980.  He is also a Certified Drug and Alcohol Counselor (CADC) in the State of Illinois.  He has spent many years working in the mental health / substance abuse field utilizing a wide range of cognitive-behavioral interventions to focus on relapse prevention and mental health wellness.  His clinical orientation is eclectic – meaning he is able to provide specific counseling strategies to meet the needs of his clients.

Mike believes in a wellness-based approach to behavioral healthcare – advocating that his clients take care of themselves physically, mentally, and spiritually to live a balanced lifestyle for optimal psychological well-being.  His professional interests include treating self-esteem issues, depression, anxiety, life-transition issues, and substance abuse related disorders.  Mike has extensive experience working in an outpatient community mental health clinic as well as an inpatient settings.  He joined the staff of Dr. Parisi & Associates, P.C. in 2015 and works in the Mount Prospect office location.

Mike has been married to his lovely wife for 31 years and lives in the Northwest suburbs.  He enjoys barbecuing on the grill, visiting with friends, exercising, and is a Chicago sports fan.  His peers tell him that he has a warm personality and is easy to talk to.

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Jim Vanderbosch, Psy.D.

Dr. Vanderbosch PicDr. James (Jim) Vanderbosch is licensed as a Clinical Psychologist in the State of Illinois and has extensive experience working in hospital (inpatient and outpatient), schools, and clinics.  He works with children, adolescents and adults providing both psychotherapy and psychological testing services.  Dr. Vanderbosch has worked with the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) conducting psychotherapy and psychological testing for child victims and adult perpetrators.

Dr. Vanderbosch completed his Bacheloreate training at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois and went on to earn his Doctor of Psychology Degree (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology in 1990.

Dr. Vanderbosch is fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) and well-connected within the Deaf and Deaf / Blind communities of Illinois.  He spent most of the last twenty-five years as the Clinical Director of two mental health programs for Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals.  He is intuitive, compassionate, and perceptive.

Dr. Vanderbosch joined Dr. Parisi & Associates, P.C. as an associate in 2016 and works in both outpatient and facilty-based settings within the practice.  Outside of work, he is father to four boys and is a weekend musician.

Michael Juhasz, LCPC, CADC

Mike Juhasz PicMichael Juhasz, LCPC, CADC is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) in the State of Illinois and received his Masters of Arts (M.A.) Degree in Psychology from the University of Illinois, Springfield in 1980.  He is also a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) in the State of Illinois.

Michael has many years of experience working in the mental health / substance abuse field utilizing a wide range of cognitive-behavioral interventions to focus on relapse prevention and mental health wellness.  His clinical orientation is eclectic, meaning he is able to provide specific counseling strategies to meet individual needs.  Michael’s style focuses on wellness – taking care of oneself physically, mentally, and spiritually – to live a balance lifestyle for optimal psychological well-being.  His professional interests including treating self-esteem issues, depression, anxiety, life transition issues, and substance abuse related disorders.  Michael has extensive experience working in an outpatient community mental health clinic as well as an inpatient setting on a variety of issues.

Michael lives with his family in the Northwest suburbs and enjoys barbecuing on the grill, visiting with friends, exercising, and is an avid Chicago sports fan.

How to Recognize the Signs of Schizophrenia

treat schizophreniaAbout one in 100 Americans are diagnosed with schizophrenia, a treatable serious mental illness that affects a person’s thoughts, feelings, mood, and overall functioning according to the American Psychological Association (APA). (1) With statistics like that, it’s a wonder why the mass public isn’t more educated about schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia is often diagnosed through early adulthood in teens and early 20s and is rarely identified later in life. At first many of the symptoms of schizophrenia may go unnoticed but by knowing what to look for and recognizing signs you can receive early treatment. To help you learn more about this mental illness and how to detect it, here’s how to recognize the signs of schizophrenia.

  • Trouble thinking logically. People with the onset of schizophrenia sometimes have trouble thinking logically. This may include making informed decisions, as well.
  • Difficulty paying attention. A short attention span, or the struggle to stay focused on one event can be a potential sign of schizophrenia. Because difficulty paying attention is a symptom for a variety of illnesses and disorders it’s important that it is paired with other symptoms as well before concluding schizophrenia.
  • Working memory problems. Because schizophrenia is a mental illness it has the ability to impair ones’ working memory, or more commonly known as short term memory. Forgetting recent events like where you set your keys or what you ate for lunch earlier that day are both examples of short term memory.
  • Hallucinations. A more serious sign of schizophrenia is experiencing hallucinations. These hallucinations often include hearing voices or seeing things that others do not see.
  • Speaking little. If you are typically a chatter box but recently don’t have the desire to speak much, there may be an underlying problem. Speaking little is another sign of schizophrenia.
  • Repetitive body movements. Agitated or repetitive body movements are common in those who suffer with schizophrenia. These movements can be seen as repetitive movements being performed over and over again.
  • False beliefs. As part of the thought disorder, false beliefs that may seem odd or wrong are believable to you even after loved ones try to redirect your thinking. These thoughts often do not line up with the person’s typical thinking and may make little to no sense.
  • Difficult to understand. As a person with schizophrenia struggles to organize their thoughts their speech can become jumbled and difficult to understand. They may even make up meaningless words or stop talking midsentence.

Coping with any mental illness is a struggle, including schizophrenia. But with 1 in every 100 Americans diagnosed with schizophrenia it’s time to better educate the public about what to look for. It’s important to note that treatment helps relieve many symptoms of schizophrenia and many people with the illness continue to lead rewarding and meaningful lives in their communities, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. (2) Learning how to recognize signs of schizophrenia is the first step toward treatment and the start to living that rewarding and meaningful life.

Mark D. Parisi, Psy.D. & Associates, P.C. provides counseling, psychological testing, and psychotropic medication management in Mount Prospect and Chicago – serving surrounding Cook, Lake, DuPage, and Will Counties. They accept most insurance and offer extremely affordable sliding scale rates. Call (847) 909-9858 for a free, no-obligation telephone consultation

 

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Sources:

  1. Recognizing the Signs of Schizophrenia, Schizophrenia statistics and definition, 2015, http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/recognizing-schizophrenia.aspx
  2. What is Schizophrenia?, Schizophrenia treatment, 2015, http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/schizophrenia/index.shtml